SKYGLOW

SKYGLOW

Sudley Walled Garden, Liverpool  |  16—18 August 2024

SKYGLOW combines astronomy, ecology, and the arts to explore the impact of the light… from the stars to the soil.

The fact is, the stars are vanishing before our eyes. A child born beneath 250 stars today will only see 100 of them by their 18th birthday.

The source of this vanishing is SKYGLOW: the pervasive glow of light caused by human-made pollution.

SKYGLOW also has significant ecological impacts. In disrupting the transition from sunlight to starlight, species behaviour, physiology, and ecosystems are altered. 

HOW TO APPLY

We’re looking for 10 writers to create a series of starlit monologues on this topic for performance.

As part of the project, we’ll be offering participants exclusive arts, astronomy, and ecology workshops with experts from the University of Central Lancashire, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, and Theatre in the Rough. You’ll then see your play performed, and published in a brand new anthology.

HOW TO APPLY:

Please complete the Google Form below by 11.59PM, Friday 7 June, 2024. (We reserve the right to close this early if we receive sufficient brilliant applications).

WRITERS MUST:

  • Be aged 12 to 25
  • Have an address in the Liverpool City Region

No previous experience or knowledge is necessary. We’re open to all.

WORKSHOP PARTNERS

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Jeremiah Horrocks Institute

Dr Mark Norris

The Jeremiah Horrocks institute is based in Preston as part of the University of Central Lancashire.

It was established in 1993 as the Centre for Astrophysics, and now pursues research into the astrophysics of planets, stars, galaxies and the Universe.

Website Link

A person standing in front of a tree

Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Professor Tim Smyth

A world leader in the field of marine research, Plymouth Marine Laboratory is committed to the delivery of impactful, cutting-edge environmental and social science in support of a healthy and sustainable ocean.

In 2022, the PML published an atlas of artificial light at night under the sea, revealsing that at a depth of 1 metre, light pollution affects 1.9 million sq km of the world’s coastal seas.

Website Link

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